"The ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do."
- Steve Jobs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

English Studio #7

2017-03-10



English Studio #7:Hundred vs Hundreds



There are common mistakes when using nouns to describe a quantity.



Wrong: Peter has two hundreds dollars.


Correct: Peter has two hundred dollars.



When you put a specific number before a noun of quantity, always use the singular form of the noun (ie. one hundred, six thousand, etc.)



Wrong: Peter has hundred of dollars.


Correct: Peter has hundreds of dollars.



When you use noun of quantity without any specific numerals, always use the plural form of the noun followed by “of” (ie. hundreds of, thousands of).




By Danny Au









English Studio #8

2017-03-10



English Studio #8: One of...



Let's learn how to use "one of..." in sentences.



Wrong: One of my friend was late.


Correct: One of my friends was late.



Notice that a plural noun (if it is a countable noun) must be used after "one of...".



In the above example, "friends" is correct, "friend" is incorrect.



Also, a singular verb must be used after "one of...".



In the above example, the singular verb "was" is correct, "were" is incorrect.



In summary, remember this structure: "one of... + plural noun + singular verb..."



Vocabulary Corner:


one of the (phr) - 其中之一


plural (adj) - 複數


singular (adj) - 單數


countable (adj) - 可數


structure (n) - 結構



By Danny Au









The Riddler #8

2017-03-10




The Riddler #8:Throw it off the highest building, and I'll not break. But put me in the ocean, and I will. What am I?



Answer:A tissue


Explanation:A piece of tissue paper is so soft that it won't break even if you drop it off a table or other high places. However, after being soaked in water, a tissue will break apart very easily.





Vocabulary:


building - (n) 大廈


ocean - (n) 海洋


soaked – (v) 浸泡


break apart - (v) 裂開



By Danny Au









Words of Wisdom #4

2016-08-07



Words of Wisdom #4


"The ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do." - Steve Jobs


"那些瘋狂到以為自己可以改變世界的人,往往就是他們真的改變了世界。" - 喬布斯




Steve Jobs (Feb. 24, 1955– Oct. 5, 2011) was an American information technology entrepreneur and inventor. He was the co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer (CEO) of Apple Inc.



Vocabulary:


Steve Jobs – (n) 喬布斯


technology – (n) 科技


entrepreneur – (n) 企業家


inventor – (n) 發明家


co-founder – (n) 聯合創始人


chairman – (n) 主席


CEO – (n) 首席執行官



By Danny Au









Brain Lab #9

2016-03-23



Brain Lab #9: How to improve your memory – Tip #03



Tip #02 –Use acrostics


Acrostics are similar to acronyms (see Brain Lab #8 for details), but you can remember a "new sentence" made up of the first letters of a set of words that you want to memorize in a specific order.



Example:


If you want to remember the order of the planets in our solar system in their right order (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune), you can form a sentence using the first letter of each planet.



"My Very Easy Method: Just Sleep Until Noon"



Vocabulary:


acrostics - (n) 離合詩


memorize - (v) 記住


order - (n) 次序


planet - (n) 行星


solar system - (n) 太陽系


By Danny Au









Idiom Coach #5

2016-03-04



Idiom Coach #5:..Can't make heads or tails of something



When you find something that is puzzling or illogical, or when you can't understand something.





Example:


I can't make heads or tails of your short story. You have really bad grammar.



Vocabulary:


can't make heads or tails of – (idiom) 無從稽考


puzzling – (adj) 令人費解


illogical – (adj) 不合理的


By Danny Au









The Riddler #7

2016-03-01




The Riddler #6: The man who invented it doesn't want it. The man who bought it doesn't need it. The man who needs it doesn't know it. What is it?



Answer: A coffin


Explanation: Nobody wants to use a coffin (including the inventor) because no one wants to be dead. The man who bought it is still alive so he doesn’t need a coffin. The man who needs it is already dead so he won’t know if he will sleep in a coffin or not!





Vocabulary:


coffin - (n) 棺材


inventor (n) - 發明者


alive – (adj) 活著


dead - (adj) 死了



By Danny Au









Brain Lab #8: How to improve your memory – Tip #02

2015-09-25



Brain Lab #8: How to improve your memory – Tip #02



Tip #02 – Use.Acronyms


When you have several pieces of information to remember, try to use the first letter of each word to form a “new word”, also called an acronym.



Example:


Colors of the rainbow are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. Take the first letter of each word and form a new name “ROY-G-BIV”.



In chemistry, “oxidation” means when something loses electrons, and “reduction” means something gains electrons. Try the acronym “LEO says GER”, which means Losing Electron is Oxidation, and Gaining Electron is Reduction.



Vocabulary:


acronym - (n) 縮寫


indigo - (n) 青色


oxidation - (n) 氧化


reduction - (n) 還原


electron - (n) 電子


By Danny Au









English Studio #5: Present & Past Participles

2015-04-09



English Studio #5: Present & Past Participles



A participle is a form of a verb that can be used as an adjective. Each verb has 2 participle forms, the present and past participles. So when do you use which participle as an adjective?





Present Participle – a verb that ends in “-ing”. It is used to describe everything except a person’s feelings.



Example #1: Peter is an exciting person.


Example #2: This movie is interesting.




Past Participle – a verb that usually ends in “-ed”. It is used only to describe a person’s feelings (it has to be a feeling or an emotion).



Example #1: Peter is interested in buying a new game.


Example #2: Mary feels excited about the upcoming trip.



Hope this issue of English Studio can help you avoid using the wrong participle form in your grammar!



By Danny Au









English Studio #6: Hundred vs Hundreds

2015-04-09



English Studio #6: Hundred vs Hundreds



There are common mistakes when using nouns to describe a quantity.



Wrong: Peter has two hundreds dollars.


Correct: Peter has two hundred dollars.



When you put a specific number before a noun of quantity, always use the singular form of the noun (ie. one hundred, six thousand, etc.).




Wrong: Peter has hundred of dollars.


Correct: Peter has hundreds of dollars.



When you use noun of quantity without any specific numerals, always use the plural form of the noun followed by “of” (ie. hundreds of, thousands of).



By Danny Au









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